Green Lantern poster: Process

Leave a Reply

Comment as a guest.

  1. Awesome post, James. Always cool to see other people’s methods in Photoshop/Illustrator. Having designed movie posters for a bit, I definitely understand your frustration with the movie industry. Good on you for making your labor of love into a great movie poster.

    Thanks for sharing!

  2. Very interesting process. The amount of planning you put into your work is amazing, and it shows in the final product. Smart choice using the fabric image, and I like the single rainbow beam on the right to give it that Signalnoise touch. Wicked job!

  3. Great article! Just a heads up: when you click on the Thinkstock link your directed to the strange adventures website :)

  4. Fantastic work James, love it how you’re so open about your work flow and processes used in your projects. The satin images used on the glove was very clever and worked a treat

  5. awesome. i just think the fabric overlay ends up making the wrinkles in the glove fall unnaturally, but other than that nitpick, stellar work.

  6. Well done, James! Thanks for the insight, nothing more inspiring to me than to see other creatives’ processes. The fresh outlook can do wonders for my own creativity!

  7. Hey, it’s not only the technique you are teaching here, but to design for pleasure. It’s not common to put so much effort on a piece that’s for yourself (at least not common for me), and to document the process!

    Big thanks.

    I liked the vector-raster blend, it really improved when you added the fists.

  8. Thanks for all the kind words, everyone. I’m happy the behind-the-scenes write up is resonating well with everyone. I had a great time working on this poster.

  9. Jack, never seen that poster before. You’re right, pretty similar. It’s weird because I actually contemplated putting the big GL logo behind the fist but axed it. Good thing. :)

  10. Everyone has their processes and discoveries, and watching a pro find their way step by step is hugely beneficial to others. Thanks very much for this.

  11. Really cool stuff James, thanks for sharing your insight! I love hearing about the background work behind the art! I’ve gained some valuable knowledge from your process, thanks a lot!

  12. Nada, I think you’re entirely missing the point. I created this poster to focus on the iconic elements of the Green Lantern character, specifically Hal’s ring as it is the source of his power. I already stated this in the post. What does he do when he uses the ring? He makes a fist. What’s more iconic then that?

    My intent here was to make a film poster that focuses on elements and designs already established in the comics and cartoons, elements that define the character. The last thing I wanted to do was force my own design ideas into this thing, because that’s exactly what the film industry does.

    Has this been done before? Absolutely. But that’s the mark I wanted to hit: classic Green Lantern.

  13. love the art and the process

    – just wondered though…
    re the date 2011 with the lantern logo in the zero

    – why not just lose the zero and enlarge the lantern?

  14. those saying the design is a rip-off don’t understand what “iconic” means.

    great design and write up too. But one pedantic qualm, the word you meant to use is “alluding,” not “eluding” in the next to last paragraph.

  15. Great post! congratulations. is always nice to see what is behind the final art.
    for those who criticize, they have not realized that design and illustration is always about references. Always. A designer does not live in a cocoon and the research process reflects attention to pop and general culture. Only the best designer knows how to draw materials to create stunning pieces.

  16. This is really amazing, as said before, it’s awesome to see the amount of work that is behind such a great visuel. Thanks twitter for the discover !

Sliding Sidebar

Signalnoise James White

About James

James White is a digital artist and speaker hailing from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. With over 20 years of experience, James has worked with many international brands and has taken the stage at design conferences across the globe. He loves hot pink, chrome text and stuff from the 1980s.

Follow me